Author Topic: Official Ball Size  (Read 24326 times)

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Offline Qcksilver

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Official Ball Size
« on: June 16, 2009, 10:14:38 AM »
I just purchased a Brunswick Kicker Foosball Table. It was used but in fantastic condition. Anyway the guy I purchased it from couldn't find the balls that it came with. So I'm trying to find a foosball or two online which I thought would be a simple task. Turns out there are different sizes and different materials that they're made of. Sounds dumb I know but that's news to me. Anyway, my questions are these:

Does anyone know what size ball I should be getting for my new table?
Does what it's made from make a difference for normal family play?

I was just gonna go with a standard foosball til I learned there were all these differences. Anyway, thanks in advance for anyone who helps me out.

Offline foozitorloozit

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Re: Official Ball Size
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2009, 10:28:02 AM »
most tornado balls I've seen are 1.360 - 1.375 (34.5mm - 35mm)

Offline Qcksilver

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Re: Official Ball Size
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2009, 02:08:54 PM »
I'm sorry but I have to ask, what's a Tornado Ball? Forgive me, I'm new to the Foosball world. I love the game but I don't know much about it. I just wanna know the size (if any) of the proper ball for the table I purchased.

Offline PatRyan

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Re: Official Ball Size
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2009, 02:50:04 PM »
Do you happen to have a picture of the table you purchsed?  We might be able to make a better recommendation.


Offline Qcksilver

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Re: Official Ball Size
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2009, 03:11:54 PM »

Offline PatRyan

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Re: Official Ball Size
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2009, 04:45:04 PM »
OK. 

The "Tornado" ball refered to is a ball that comes with the Tornado brand of foosball table.

The Tornado ball should work perfectly in your table, as would a "Dynamo" ball.

The Dynamo ball is probably a little grippier than the Tornado ball. 

As for what would have come new with the table, who knows.  Probably plain white slick plastic.  Doesn't matter now.  What matters now is what ball you want to use. 

As far as size, What was posted as a size for the "Tornado" ball will work just fine.


http://foosdirect-store.stores.yahoo.net/foosballs.html

Any of the balls listed on the above site will work in your table, I would recommend the Tornado, Dynamo, or yellow shelti balls. 

The site listed above is brought to you by Foosball.com (the guys who provide this wonderful forum we are posting in).  They are very knowledgable and can help you with any questions not answered here.



Offline Qcksilver

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Re: Official Ball Size
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2009, 10:51:01 PM »
What's the difference between a ball that's 1 1/2" and one that's 1 1/4". Besides the obvious please. I've found several sized like this on the internet. I plan on ordering from the post above but just curious on why they sell different sized balls. Thanks.

Offline foozkillah

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Re: Official Ball Size
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2009, 03:42:30 PM »
I've played with those smaller-than-standard white "rock" balls.  They seem heavier and don't accelerate on the roll as fast, which makes sense.  Most of these that you can grip will definitely stub more easily, since you don't have to have the player's foot as far back to get closer to the top of the ball.  And also as they get dirtier.  Overall, they kinda ruin later play on tables with the 34.5 to 35 mm balls, especially if you play or plan to play competitively away from your table.  And I've also played with those lighter but smaller white, slippery plastic balls molded into miniature soccer balls.  Not a fun-killer if you've nothing else, but still more difficult to learn to control the ball with.

Most players will order whatever ball they're used to, which is prolly what came with their table or the table at the venue they play most often at.  Venue promoters who usually order larger batches will order the same way, unless for economic reasons they can get cheaper balls made for other tables and will even mix and match these.  Coin-op promoters and venue managers have to keep in mind that certain balls may jam or make their tables continuous operation problematic.  And promoters who run tourneys will almost definitely have standard balls as close to tournament spec as possible, although these will be older and dirtier from use at their venues.

Competition players, whether at their locals or even on one of the tours, will of course seek to practice with the balls played on the tables at their local or tour events, if they can.  Some will have accumulated a varied collection after a while, due to the several ball changes mandated by the tour.

I believe the most standard ball size is as denoted above, 34.5 to 35mm.  Those smaller (1.25") balls in the 31.75 to 32mm range would be non-standard for local or tour play, and so would those gigantic (1.5") 38+mm balls.  Most standard around should be 1.37x" (1 3/8") or 35mm.  So depending on your table, your original idea of getting the original balls should be ok... if you're playing locals or plan to play competitively on tour, however, even just super-regionals, you better get the 35mm ones.  Those should be fine for that home model Brunswick you have.  Heavier balls should also work better with those half-height or 2/3 height goal openings, which don't allow "top-shelf" shots like you get with Tornado or Warrior or Stryker tables.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2009, 03:58:24 PM by foozkillah »

Offline Qcksilver

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Re: Official Ball Size
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2009, 09:07:17 PM »
Thanks very very much for the reply foozkillah. I completely understand now, your explanation was perfect. I think I'll go with the Tornado white ball.

But now I have another question. In your post you referred to my Brunswick table as a "home model". I understand that it's probably not the table the pros use but do you think, in your honest opinion please, it a bad table? I thought I got a pretty good deal on it, and it's in fantastic shape. Looks and practically is brand new. Please be honest, I do love the table and will definately keep it but the truth is the truth, I can take it.

Offline foozkillah

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Re: Official Ball Size
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2009, 03:20:41 AM »
You're quite welcome, QS,

If you just started playing foos, that table should be fine.  If it moves too much during play, you can figure out how to add 40 to 60 lbs of weight to it, perhaps with a bracket.  It's especially advantageous if you get some vids or watch some streaming vid of professional play.  YouTube is also a very good source for instructionals and tutorials, thanks to the awesome foosing vid pioneers.  Watch these and try to figure out what they're doing.  If you have questions, this forum here is awesome, if you're willing to wade through certain verbose descriptions or those that are vague if you've never tried them before.  You will find the majority of posters here, those with experience, very helpful.

Of course, trying out what you learn and taking your licks is the fastest way of learning foosball, along with the audio-visual aids and tutorials.  You may or may not have access to a local group, even if they only get together for pickup games.  Don't know which area you're in, but if you're close (20-45min away) at least to some mid-major metropolitan area (250K popn or more) you should find one or more venues to play at.  Foosball is very very good at giving instant feedback to whatever you try with eye-hand-coordination, in a very compact space with up to 4 people.

It's close quarters play can really hook you.  Nothing else at the speed it's played comes close, except perhaps table tennis or arm wrestling.  Everything else needs more space, like billiards or tennis or shuffleboard, where you contend and actually move, as opposed to poker or other card and video games.  Not even full-contact Mixed Martial Arts, requiring an Octagon space.

Come to think of it, there is that old gang pastime where you tie each other's left hands and wrists together and try to stab each other with a switchblade or whack with a tire iron or blackjack, (allowing for regional preferences, of course) but that gets a little dicey, especially with the kids!