Author Topic: Static rollover  (Read 3951 times)

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Offline Old Meister

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Static rollover
« on: April 04, 2011, 10:05:23 PM »
I don't get why one would want to fake all over the place to do a rollover when it is much easier and enjoyable to sit on it and execute a "clean" one, two three move shot. Just my take on it I guess but why make it complicated. Any shot can be done faster than human reaction time so why give any hints? Rather,, learn to execute a pure shot from multiple positions. So it's clean and you win,,,

Offline alaskan thunder

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Re: Static rollover
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2011, 10:05:11 AM »
IME there are lots of good goalies who, for whatever reason, will brick a standard snake shot. I don't walk the snake all the time or fake all the time, but there are some instances where it may be a necessary tool to open up the defense. It gets me some easy points so why not have it in the arsenal? 

Offline foozkillah

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Re: Static rollover
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2011, 12:06:03 AM »
Static or "stand-still" rollovers, after observing hundreds of snakers, including many PMs and Pros over the years... are just that much harder to shoot consistently with.   Great for a quickset but it seems especially much harder to consistently go square long on one or either side (any square push or pull wider than a 3/4).  Seen several that have an obvious hitch to go the extra lateral distance.
;;
A smooth wide rocking motion seems the easiest to
1. hide your takeoff,
2. disguise a fake or double fake to one side,
3. make for reliable longs on either side no matter the ball, field surface,
   or rod characteristics or qualities (which can change drastically from one table to the next).
;;
Plus there's a rhythmic warmup for every rocking snake built-in.. easier I guess to groove into one's fave release points.
;;
As for defending it... besides the natural difficulty of not seeing a standstill too often. not a lot. Still "do they execute" or not.

Offline Old Meister

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Re: Static rollover
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2011, 12:05:49 PM »
I guess I should explain what I'm talking about when I say static. I like to sit at center without movement and when I feel it I might shoot a quick one hitch reversal or a double hitch or that one-move true static push or pull. And of course either a straight or a small hitch to a straight. It all depends on how reactive the goalie is. If they are smooth and unlikely to bite on quick hitches then I might go a bit bigger with my fakes. The key to all this is being relaxed and reading the goalie along with sitting long enough to keep him guessing and a smooth take-off without tells. The difference between a single hitch to a double hitch makes it impossible to make the adjustment should the goalie guess wrong, and he has both that to worry about and worry about when it will happen. Many good goalies will spread leaving the center open so a smooth one hitch back to center becomes a great shot. I like that the goalie has to move while I study and visualize the shot. Dribbling all over works fine but it has become generic and the good goalies make "offerings" which give them a certain amount of control. With my approach I can even not look at the "D" but rather visualize, count time, and execute. I like this type of play, it's a little different and it is based on being calm. I love the look of a good goalie when I first hit him with a fast mini pull-push-pull and he's over there for the push ;D. One of my favorite matches recently was getting in "the zone" and executing so smooth that the goalie , who was one of the area's better goalies, cried out loud at the last shot, "There's no way! I had it blocked! How did that go there?!!" Oh how sweet the moment,,
« Last Edit: April 11, 2011, 12:17:42 PM by Old Meister »

Offline SilentSam

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Re: Static rollover
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2011, 05:18:07 PM »
My take on this is that static rollers have more tells, hence making them raceable. Even if you introduce hitches, unless your hitches look 100% like your normal takeoff, a veteran defender will be able to tell. A constant rock hides your takeoff much better.My take on this is that static rollers have more tells, hence making them raceable. Even if you introduce hitches, unless your hitches look 100% like your normal takeoff, a veteran defender will be able to tell. A constant rock hides your takeoff much better.

Offline Sniff

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Re: Static rollover
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2011, 07:26:58 PM »
Static rollovers (tend to) fail in pressure situations. A major benefit of a rollover over the pull is that it is easier to shoot in pressure situations (one being the advantage of using the wrist, the other being that you are constantly moving). When you are constantly moving, it's easier to keep the arm loose, and are thus less susceptible to gagging. So, if you take away the movement part, you take away a huge advantage of using the shot.