Author Topic: Is this a legal shot? (Video included)  (Read 605 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline BBFooser

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Is this a legal shot? (Video included)
« on: April 29, 2017, 12:56:58 PM »
Hey everyone! Wanted to get a ruling if this is a legal shot. The spin should be legal, but it involves an 'ungrasped rod' during the spin, which I've read mixed rulings on, but can't find anything the ITSF rulebook about.
Link to video here: https://media.giphy.com/media/mPzmWpwcYuuA0/giphy.gif
 

Offline eamez

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 30
Re: Is this a legal shot? (Video included)
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2017, 06:46:10 PM »
That man spins over 360 so i would say its illegal.  why not just do a normal push shot.

Offline bolt115

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 105
Re: Is this a legal shot? (Video included)
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2017, 09:32:17 AM »
To be illegal it would need to be 360 before or after striking ball...the video does not look like it breaks that rule. I am not a fan of being able to release rod as you shoot but it is done a lot with the "flip"  straight shot.   

Offline snake eyes

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 450
  • Carpe De Foos
Re: Is this a legal shot? (Video included)
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2017, 08:54:16 AM »
Not a shot I would spend any time learning but,,, I do see Tony Spredeman use the flippy once in a while if he catches you leaving a straight open when he sets up his roller  :o

Offline 6bartives

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Re: Is this a legal shot? (Video included)
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2017, 09:44:31 PM »
This is kind of a variation of the standard roll-over, except starting from the leading side of the ball, the shot starts from the middle axis of the ball. When the man comes around and strikes the ball, the man has still rotated only slightly less than 360 degrees by striking the back of the ball. However, the fact that the handle is released completely does run the risk of letting go for too long and rotating for more than 360 degrees after striking the ball. the roll-over gets around this by ending up in the shooters knuckle and avoids the problem of rotating more than 360 degrees after striking the ball.